#SitkinsIsTheSolution

Five Critical Mindsets of Successful Insurance Professionals

podcast Sep 24, 2021
 

Brent Kelly:

Welcome to the Agent Leader Podcast. My name is Brent Kelly, your host. Thanks so much for joining me on another episode. And if you are joining me via video, you can already see that I have a very special guest. Roger Sitkins will be joining me today on the Agent Leader Podcast. And we're going to be talking about five critical mindsets of successful insurance professionals. And we'll get to that in a minute. But I do want to remind you, again, if you were listening on audio, you do now know that we will also be on video. So whether it's on our YouTube channel or on our website, you can check that out. And if you want a visual representation, maybe you do, maybe you don't, Roger. I don't know, but if you want some video, we're going to have both audio and video for this podcast.

Brent Kelly:

As always, the purpose of the Agent Leader Podcast is to help you and your insurance agency to gain clarity, build consistency, and to make a commitment to become your best version possible. Something we truly believe in and we continue to hear again and again, with the insurance agencies, and professionals, and producers that we love working with, it really is about that clarity, consistency, and commitment of the best version possible. One note too, if you're an agency leader looking for some clarity, right now, as of today, we've got a tool for you. Go to sitkins.com/scorecard sitkins.com/scorecard and you can get a scorecard that will allow you to see exactly where your agency is today in some critical areas. This has been a very useful resource for a lot of agencies. And we want to offer it to you, as a listener or a viewer of this podcast at no cost. So with that, Roger, you ready to dive into today's content on mindsets?

Roger Sitkins:

Absolutely, Brent. It's one of our favorite topics and things that we're seeing, that people are really, really reacting to, realize that at the end of the day, it is all about mindset.

Brent Kelly:

And we just kicked off and again, recording this a day after. So I'm not sure when it'll be released. But we just, yesterday, kicked off it was our seventh virtual producer program and we've done a lot of producer programs, our seventh virtual producer program, which is live and interactive. And one of the things that we continue to hear again and again about our programs is one of the things that you guys really have challenged me on and encouraged me on is, am I thinking right? Is my mindset in the right spot? In fact, our first session is primarily a mindset session. A lot of people are like, "Well, geez, when are we going to get to all the strategies and the processes?" Don't worry, we will.

Brent Kelly:

But here's what I always share, Roger, and get your thoughts before we get into these five key mindsets that we've talked about, is the fact that for you to have external change, improvement, transformation in your business, in your life, you got to look within first. And a big part looking within is that thing between the ears. So mindset is so critical to what we're thinking. So before we get into the five, and by the way, hopefully you get pen and paper, unless you're driving, to take notes. Because I promise Roger and I have talked about some of these things. He's going to go very deep and give you some practical ideas on some mindset shifts that you need to have. Before we get into the five, Roger, anything you want to say as a precursor?

Roger Sitkins:

Well, I think probably one of the biggest breakthroughs we see in the producer program, especially like you said, the seventh one we're running, by the way, there are eight sessions each. So it's not like a one day thing because we all know those don't work. But one of the things we're seeing is when we start talking to people about getting a mindset around what's your best version possible, because all of us have a much bigger and better version possible if we'll commit to it. And a term that when it was really sticky yesterday with a hundred and some people on there, was the fact that stop negotiating with your best version possible. And that's what we say, is, "Well, I know I should do it," but then they come up with excuses or they, I guess one of my new favorite words or sayings is justify.

Roger Sitkins:

They can tell you exactly why they're not doing it. And I heard a great definition of justify, it's just a lie. You're really lying to yourself. And boy, when we've said that to people, we noticed that even yesterday, they went, "Wow, you're right. I am negotiating with myself. I'm justifying why I'm not doing it." And then, Brent, the other big reason is the semi-successful trap. "I'm still doing okay." Yeah, you are, but you're not on the road to financial freedom, unless you've got a bazillion dollars on your book. I mean, we don't know what that number is, but just, again, stop negotiating with yourself. And then the other big mindset before we get into some specific ones here, is the fact that all of us have roadblocks. There's always going to be a roadblock, an obstacle that comes up and we stressed to them yesterday.

Roger Sitkins:

Say, "Look, the reality is, you have to have your guard rails in place." And guard rails, just like on a highway, keep you lined up. You won't always be in the middle of the road and you won't always be perfect, but your guard rails will keep you going in the right direction. And for us, the guard rails are when you get to the point of what are my not optional behaviors and strategies as a producer? It's one of our favorite things we talk about because we see people going, "You're right. There are certain things I just have to make non-optional," that's a mindset. And then realize that when we come to the roadblocks, okay, we'll get around and we'll slowly navigate, but then we're still going to get back on the path to that best version possible. So it's really been impactful with the people.

Brent Kelly:

Yeah, it has. I've done stop negotiating with your best version possible. I mean, you just think about that. And we all do it, to a degree. And I think that the biggest thing with mindset, before we get into these five specific areas, is just the awareness of when it's coming in play, right, in my life. And you've had a few of those, Roger, you've mentioned to me. I had some of those like, "Wow you know what? Because I've been talking about it, because we teach it, you feel it." And so in the podcast today, again, we're going to go through five, and are there more than five? Probably, right?

Brent Kelly:

But I think if we talk, these five really stand out. And so, Roger, I want to get your perspective on each of these. Certainly, we can just have some open dialogue and some lessons that you've learned and I've learned. But I know for the audience, get them to think practically on, okay, mindset, it's a bit of a buzzword. Mindset, mindset, but what do we mean by that? And where do we see this come to play? So I'm going to go through five, we'll start with number one here, which is a relationship mindset. So what does that mean, Roger? Say a mindset relationship, what does that mean to you?

Roger Sitkins:

Do you believe that it's still about relationships? I absolutely believe in technology. People think I don't necessarily embrace it. I embrace it more than most people even know I do. But I don't believe technology is going to replace the relationship. In fact, the one book that we've recommended for a couple of years now, is that Humans Are Underrated and that what brilliant performers or high performers know, that high-impact or intense machines, whatever they're calling them, don't know. And so, yes, I want to use technology. I want to get all the tools and resources I can through technology. But at the end of the day, it's still about relationships. At least that's what I believe because I don't want to be in the commodity business.

Roger Sitkins:

If you're in the commodity business, and a lot of you have a big part of your agency there and that's fine, and it can be profitable, okay? But when you start looking at the top 20% of everything we do, Paretos Principle, and apply it to relationships. Well, then we say, okay, what are the relationships we really have to manage and how do we identify who the most important ones are, the vital few versus the trivial many? So we look at them and say, well, number one, it's clients. Now, all clients, if we keep them in the agency, if they're not in a service center, if they're in our agency, they deserve great service. But they deserve service at the level that they've paid for.

Roger Sitkins:

And many times what we see is that the A accounts are under-serviced and the C accounts are over serviced. And we've talked about 80/20 a thousand times at least. But it starts with what are your relationships with your clients? And what's that client experience? And if it's not designed, it's just random or sporadic, well, guess what? You're going to have some retention issues. And more importantly, you're not going to create raving fans that turn into multipliers for you. So the first one, Brett, is clients, okay? Next one of course, is not suspects, not prospects, get rid of those words. Suspects and prospects are the ones that the clicks pings, rings, and dings, they give you an opportunity to practice quote and do some unpaid consulting, because you've not identified them. You're not marketing specifically to them, okay?

Roger Sitkins:

Brent, I think you were the one that taught me the term, I'm not sure where it came from, but if you market to all, you market to no one versus just getting very, very specific. So knowing exactly what a future ideal client looks like, every agency will be different, every producer will be different. But if you don't know exactly what a future ideal client looks like, and if you don't have a specific marketing plan for each one of your top 20, well, you're going to be busy and everything, but you're not really going to manage the relationship. And the reality is, with the best customers, the best future customers you're going after, it's rare that the first year you try to go to them, you get them.

Roger Sitkins:

Some of the best producers we work with tell stories all the time, one of my best friends in the business, ever, always tells this story about the time that he had an account that he worked for eight years. He didn't quote it for eight years, but he marketed to it for eight years because his attitude was, and I hope this is the attitude for everybody listening or watching today, is that every great account will eventually move. And when it moves, it's going to move to me because I will be positioned as the logical next choice, based upon value I'm bringing them, marketing I'm doing to them, branding I'm doing, whatever it may be. And so he worked this account eight years and finally got it. But it was $400,000 of commission income. Divide that out, it's still a pretty good annual return, it just took time to get it.

Roger Sitkins:

But knowing what those top 20 are, constantly working them. So clients, future ideal clients. Next one, carriers. Yes, so much of the underwriting now is totally based on technology. And I get it and I appreciate it. But on those larger accounts, those ones that are the whales that'll make a major difference. Those are the ones that will be maybe not just the top 5%, but the top 2%, the top 2% of the clients or a third of the revenue, top 5% or 50%, those types of accounts you're going after, you still need to be very, very close to the underwriter. The underwriters overall, the carriers overall, do you really know what their appetite is? Are you sending them stuff you should never, ever, ever send them, okay? We just see some of the statistics on this and it's ridiculous, the things that carriers receive from agencies. 

Roger Sitkins:

What about your top of the stack submission? Are you making sure that what you send them is something that when they see it come in, in their inbox, their online portal, or if it's snail mail, however, it shows up, that the underwriter looks at it, they know your name. You've got a great brand with them and they say, "Wow, this is going to be complete, accurate, and total, and it matches my appetite. And I've got a really good chance of getting." So a big part of the carrier's little thing, Brent, are you thanking them? Are you reaching out and recognizing them? How many thank you notes have you written to underwriters in the last quarter? How many letters did you send to the underwriter's boss saying, "You know what? She did a great job, he did a great job,"? Those things go in their personnel file. Make deposits to make deposits. Next one of course, is the team members.

Roger Sitkins:

So we've got clients, future ideal clients, carriers and now our team members. I'm really amazed, in fact, I haven't had a chance to tell you this one yet. One of the chief revenue officer sales managers that we work very close with one of our private clients called me and he said, "We've got a producer," we're going to call him Brent, because it's not Brent. "But we've got a producer that's really, he's going to call you." And I said, "Well, actually he already called me today, I have a voicemail, I haven't had a chance to return it." He's got a major problem, he doesn't understand it. He is constantly talking down to his service team and he can't understand why people keep quitting. And so there's no real, we talk about the art of account management, the alignment, respect, and trust, okay? And appreciation and what's the other one? Rapport and teamwork. All right, so we've got all-

Brent Kelly:

All kinds of stuff, but you got them, yeah.

Roger Sitkins:

So I'm going to have a call with this producer and he's a great guy. He's got a great book of business, he had a million dollars, but he's really struggling because he's not thanking his team. So clients, future ideal clients, carriers, our team members, making deposits with them. And finally, the centers of influence. If relationships still matter at the highest level of accounts, then we darn well better understand that the best referral we can get is from a center of influence, who's already working with the client. One of the future ideal client's current trusted advisors, who says, "You know what? You need to go see Brent Kelly from Kelly Risk Services."

Roger Sitkins:

Because we all know that those types of referrals and introductions are easy sales. This is something we talk about a lot. We talked about it yesterday with a new group. All too often, we see that a producer makes an easy sale and they say, "Well, that was easy." Well, why was it easy? Well, this attorney referred to me in, or the CPA referred me in, or the wealth manager banker referred me in and I just kind of took it over. I say, "Okay." And that was easier. I say, "Well, isn't easy okay?" First of all, it wasn't easy. You might've done a decade of work to build the trust factor there. But understanding that the key is if it's easy, figure out why it was easy and replicate it at least five times.

Roger Sitkins:

So those are the key relationships, Brent. And it's a mindset saying, "You know what? At the end of the day I want relationships." Yes, I'm going to embrace that I got them with technology. I'm going to bring all the tools and services in I can, but it's still going to be at the type of accounts I want to write in the non-commodity sector, whether it's small commercial, large commercial, large benefits, whatever it may be. That we're saying, "You know what? Some way, somehow there's going to be a relationship here." Short-term relationships are price, long-term relationships create friendships and a heck of a lot more money.

Brent Kelly:

Yeah. Well, the last thing you said, Roger, it really hit me too. It's just the idea of what game you're playing? Are you a short game or long game? And anybody that really has a career in the business, wants a career in the business, they know it's a long term project, so to speak. And you mentioned the word and just to reiterate it, we talk a lot about it, is, are you making more deposits? Are you taking more withdrawals? And that's true in all those different areas you mentioned in relationship. Last thing I want to share on this because it, it hit me.

Brent Kelly:

I made a note as you were writing, it struck me. It's been a while since I thought about it, I went to a large leadership event, it's been a few years ago now. And part of it was to be able to ask questions and here he was talking about adding value, right? Which is about relationships. How do I add value to your life, Roger, or someone else's life? And what does that look like? I said, "What's the best way to add value?" Of all the things out there, what's the best way to add value? And the speaker, who was up there, by the way, his name was John Maxwell. 

Roger Sitkins:

Yeah, he knows a little bit.

Brent Kelly:

Yeah, so he's written a hundred books-ish on leadership. But I just, here I am, I'm like, "Well, I'm going to ask John a question." I said, "What's the best way you've seen to add value to people in their lives?" And I'll never forget, he kind of stopped. And I thought, "Oh, I got him. I don't know if he has a great answer here." And he kind of looked, and he stopped, and he said, "Brent," well, he didn't know my name. I had my name tag. But he's like, "The best way to add value is to first value people." Part of this is that we try to put these deposits in because Roger told me to, so to speak versus you know what? I value you and what you do. And because of that, inherently, guess what I'm probably going to do? Add value to you, so-

Roger Sitkins:

Anybody watching or listening, think of the last time you said, "Wow, that was really nice." Isn't that really the reaction you want from clients, future ideal clients, carriers, team members, and centers of influence? "Wow, that was really nice." Because you did something extra. And you don't have to do a lot, you just have to do something because the bars we've talked about before, it's so low in our industry, in this area.

Brent Kelly:

Yep, and if you don't think relationships are important, just ask them how your last 18 months went on relationships, right?

Roger Sitkins:

Yeah.

Brent Kelly:

I mean, it's just, it's one of those things. But again, it's just taken for granted. I love what you said, Roger. It just, it's a mindset. I'm going to wake up every day and go, "How can I provide value? How can I add to this relationship?" So thank you for sharing that.

Roger Sitkins:

And by the way, you better thinking you better remember this at home too.

Brent Kelly:

Well yeah. Yeah. Well, and I've said this on this podcast. I say this in our camp, you just said it. It's one of those things, when we speak and teach, you feel sometimes when you're falling short, and one of my favorite sayings, Roger, you've heard me say this many times, that silent gratitude is no gratitude at all.

Roger Sitkins:

Oh yeah. Today, by the way, is my wife's birthday. So I've got to get done with this-

Brent Kelly:

Okay, when we get off, yeah. Thanks for reminding me too. So we'll both add value, but yours is more important than mine. Number two, we had on for mindsets was productivity mindset. And to say that you're not passionate on this, Roger, would be the understatement of the year. So tell me about this mindset of productivity, getting stuff done.

Roger Sitkins:

Well, it's not wearing busy as a badge of honors we talk about, that's not productivity. It's not getting results. This is about compressing time and accelerating results, being productive. What does productivity mean? Being productive, but I mean being highly productive. So what are some of the ways we measure it? Well, an easy measurement for everybody of course, is to take a look at their revenue per employee, more importantly, spread per employee. And take a look at the best practices. And I'll just tell you this right out, if your agency is not at, at least $200,000 of revenue per employee, you better take a hard look at it. You better take a hard look at it.

Roger Sitkins:

Certainly a minimum, I remember, Brent, when the minimum used to be 100, then it was 150, now maybe 175, and 180. But if you look at best practices, it's over 200,000 now. That's where you should be. Now, how do you get that up? Well, number one, you've got to start taking a hard look at how productive your producers are. So look at your gross revenue, gross commission per validated producer. Is that at a level it should be? Look at the revenue and number of accounts your account managers are handling, your service team is handling, whether it's personalized, VIP, personal, small commercial, large commercial, small benefits, large benefits. Start measuring those things to find out what's the productivity?

Roger Sitkins:

It's amazing to me when, we work with agencies and we dive deep on some of these numbers and we'll find that we have two service people handling the same type of accounts and one will have 500 accounts and the other one will have 750. But they're both busy. And just even knowing, from a productivity perspective, what percent of the technology, the agency automation system, agency management system are they using today. It's really low. So we take all of that. But one of the biggest things is, we've got to have producers who actually produce. This [inaudible 00:18:56] get around definition of a producer, someone who actually produces. And if we're going to compress time and accelerate results, the number one thing we have to do, and here's, Brent, this is Sitkins, not even 101, it's Sitkins1, we have to have a strong division between sales and service.

Roger Sitkins:

We have to get the producers doing just four key activities. And this is what we've talked about before, red zone versus green zone. The green zone is when producers are doing one of four things or a combination of the four. They're selling, they're managing relationships, which we just talked about. They have a formal continuation process, not a renewal process. And finally, they're filling up their pipelines. Those are green zone activities. What we see and we've been just randomly talking to some agencies, recently, agencies that are looking to join us or some that may be struggling and say, "How many appointments per week is your average producer having?" And it's blowing me away. I was talking to a... I think we might even have mentioned this in one of the other podcasts recently.

Roger Sitkins:

I was talking to a prospective client of ours, okay? We had identified them as a future ideal member and had a great conversation. And we had the new sales manager with the agency owners. I said, "How many appointments per week are your average producers having?" And the sales manager said, "Two." I said, "No, no, not per day, per week." She said, "Two." Well, we dug a little deeper by the way, afterwards and found out it was actually closer to four because she wasn't including some, or he wasn't including some of the virtual meetings that were happening, four? That's not very productive. So getting the producers into a situation where we start identifying what are the most important KPIs for an agency, TSS, time spent selling?

Roger Sitkins:

We are not going to get productive if we don't improve time spent selling, that's the four key areas. So we just come back to it and say, "Do you have part-time or full-time producers?" Well, if you have part-time producers, you're not going to be very productive. You always score points when you're in the game or I like to use the analogy because I like to fish. I don't do it enough, but I like to fish. I notice I'm not catching a lot of fish right now because I'm not fishing and I don't have my bait in the water. So I don't care how you look at it. But the end of the day, are you just saying, "Well, things are going along pretty good." Or you saying, "How do we compress time to get results and accelerate the actual results?" Well, you've got to do the things we just talked about in number one.

Brent Kelly:

Yeah, so many nuggets in there and I hope again, people are taking notes at home and writing these things down. But it just, it hits you. One of the things, Roger, we talk about all the time too. In fact, this was a little of the conversation we had yesterday and we certainly will have in our next session of our camp because we get it a lot in the activities versus results area of business. But it's just this idea that back to what you said, the definition of producers, one who produces. If I were to say, "Hey, what's your ultimate role? What are you really here for in this profession of yours?" Well, it's to sell, right? I mean, obviously, you've got to do that through relationships, there are aspects. But it's to retain and obtain ideal clients, something you say all the time, Roger.

Brent Kelly:

And then we look at like, well, what does your calendar invite for next week? Well, two things we hear. Either it's filled with just random stuff or filled with nothing. And then the week goes by and it's like, "Well, I was just pretty busy." I mean, to me, it's no different in preparation for anything in life. If it's that important, why would it not be on your calendar? And by the way, if hey go, "Well, I'd love to have more appointments, they're just not on there." Well then maybe you need time in your calendar next week to make sure the following week, there are more appointments, right? However you're going to do that.

Brent Kelly:

And the analogy and you kind of, you teed it up a little bit, but when I talk to agencies, often time, Roger, they're like, "We're really struggling to grow or our producers aren't doing as much as we'd like them to do." And you find out, it's like, "Well, it's because you're trying to play, for example, a four quarter game." I don't care if it's football or whatever sport you want. But your producers are really only in the game for about a quarter. And then you wonder why you're struggling. They're not doing the things they're supposed to be doing, period. And it's as basic as that, but it's so often overlooked. So any additional comments from that?

Roger Sitkins:

Yeah. I mean, it reminds me of one of the podcasts we did that really got a lot of response, which was the one about producer recruitment starts at home. Stop. I agree, you've got to recruit, you should be recruiting all the time. There's no question about that. But don't think adding two or three more producers is going to solve your problem if your current model, your business model, is that your producers spend less than 20% of their time in the green zone. Well guess what? Then the new producers you have will pretty much figure out, "Well, I guess that's our model." Something we've talked about a lot lately is that your current business model is perfectly designed for you to achieve the results you're currently achieving.

Roger Sitkins:

That's a big duh in blinding flash of the obvious and everything else. Whatever results you're getting today are based on your current business model. And if you're a business model is, it's okay for the producers to stay in the red zone, 60, 70, 80% of the time, which is the service trap, or just hiding behind activities, then you're going to have trouble. Producer recruitment starts at home, get your current producers producing, okay, productivity. Get your current producers producing, so that when you bring the new ones in, they look at the role model and they go, "Oh, well, in this agency, I'm supposed to have 12 appointments a week. Got it, got it." So it's talk about mindset.

Brent Kelly:

Well, obviously you mentioned producer mindset in particular, but obviously it's agency mindset, this goes back to culture. And part of that is what are the language and behaviors that are normal in your agency? And if it's normal, they're like... everyone else... It's normal. So very important ideas there. So we've talked about relationship, we've talked about productivity. Let's get to number three, growth mindset. One of my favorites, they're all my favorite. But this one's, I love this one too. So, Roger, tell me about growth mindset.

Roger Sitkins:

Well, I don't know too many agencies that if you went to and said, "You guys want to grow?" That they go, "Nah, we're just kind of coasting." And of course the law of gravity says you can only coast in one direction, okay? But most would say they want to grow. And say, "Well, how are you going to grow?" "We're going to sell more insurance." "How are you going to do that?" "We're just going to sell more insurance." It's crazy, that it doesn't work that way, okay? It doesn't work that way. So the growth mindset, first of all, always comes back to an attitude of continual and never-ending improvement. Can I continue on never-ending improvement?

Roger Sitkins:

When we look at the best people we work with and when we challenge ourselves, Brent, as you know. It's how do we continue to get better? How do we continue to grow? What's our continual and never ending improvement? Because my attitude is I'm going to outlearn, so that I can outearn others. And I would hope that every agency has that attitude. When you come back to it though, I think people really, they're looking for too big of a jump right away. Oh, we're going to go from 3% growth to 15% growth. Well, that sounds good. But how many people are doing it? How many people are doing it? Can you 2X or 3X your growth rate? Yeah, yeah. But the mindset has to be small, incremental things that are consistent, the law of compounded... I think you're going to talk about that one, but-

Brent Kelly:

Compounded consistency, yeah.

Roger Sitkins:

Compounded consistency, thank you. That's why we're a great team.

Brent Kelly:

Hey, I'm here. I'm here.

Roger Sitkins:

Okay. But you look at this and say, "If you just could get 1% better. If you were really focused, could you get 1% better in a week?" Well, that would be tough. What about a day? Certainly not in a day. What about in a month? If you really focused, could you get 1% better in all the important areas? Yeah. What does that mean? Then, at the end of the year you'd be 12%. This actually would be more because of the compounding, okay? But we look at this, in fact, there was something I pulled the other day and I just love this one. I've got it down here, so I wouldn't forget it. First of all, a quote, this is from Charles Kettering, "If you've always done it that way, it's probably wrong." Think about that.

Roger Sitkins:

And that's something I hear all the time, "Why are you doing this?" "Well, it's just the way we've always done it." And because in our industry, you can be semi successful doing it the way you've always done it. Things are changing so fast. People don't even realize they've been disrupted yet because it's still such a great business, huge changes coming, okay? But if you've always done it that way, it's probably wrong. And I love this whole attitude of the 1% rule. And the 1% rule states that over time, the majority of rewards in any given field will accumulate to the people, teams, and organizations that maintain just a 1% advantage over their competition.

Roger Sitkins:

Let's face it, the vast majority of agencies, what you have to offer is not really that much different. It really isn't, okay? And then people say, "Well, then it come down to price?" Well, yes. But I'll bet there have been times on a piece of new business, you bid low and didn't get the account. And there's other times where you were on a renewal and you were high and kept the account. So yes, price matters, but it's not the only thing. Start looking for what are some of the advantages you have? In fact, Brent, you just did one of our monthly sales meetings for our members this past Monday and it was scratch your niche. How to really make sure that you're very focused because the best producers have that.

Roger Sitkins:

But getting to the point where you start thinking, what's our slight advantage? Because there's not much difference. In fact, there's a book, The Slight Edge that I really, really love. And it just talks about this, what's the thing you can do to just be 1% better? Because here's what's really interesting. If you're taking notes, please write this one down. The game you play is a winner take all game, it's a winner take all game. See, this is not like the Olympics where there's a medal for second place or third place, okay? There's no medal for second place in our game. And so what are we going to do? Like 1% Olympic athletes win by less than 1% of the time. It's one 1000th of a time.

Roger Sitkins:

You look at the PGA and the average scores, I remember correctly, somebody will correct me on this, but it's pretty close, that the average winning score of the pros versus the average 10th place, is way less than like 1% at the end, if you accumulate or maybe it's 2%. The point being is you don't have to do a lot different. You just have to be different. And this is one of our favorite topics and yet greatest frustrations. What are your five points of differentiation? If you just knew those and you ran with them on a regular basis, and that was your 1%, it would amazing. But so the key is how do I grow at least 1% at a minimum every month in every key area of my agency? You take that attitude and you start challenging your leaders and all of your team members on that. It's amazing because again, it's not about making this quantum leap in a day. It's about consistently getting better, Brent.

Brent Kelly:

Yeah, two things I want to share from all, that was powerful things and a lot of note-taking, hopefully people are having here. Two things, I'll start with the one you recently mentioned was just, I think what happens in terms of the growth mindset is that we expect it all to happen overnight, or at least we want it to happen overnight. And so the easiest analogy to me is, again, you've seen these too, Roger, where you see the before and after pictures of people who are trying to get in shape. And they go from let's just say, right, vibing out of shape to like lean and ripped, right? Whatever that is.

Roger Sitkins:

Well, that's sort of like the two of us, I'm the before, you're the after.

Brent Kelly:

No, I got a lot of work to do too. But it's just this idea that like, you look at it and I think with producers like, "Oh, I want to be a million dollar producer," or whatever the case is. Our agency wants to be this. And it's a good idea, it's a good thought. But what we forget is all that stuff in the middle, that's the consistent stuff that gets you there. And so what seems to happen is like, "Well, that would be really cool." And then you realize some of the work that has to go in and you're like, "Nah, I don't know if we could ever get there anyway, so just forget it." Am I hitting home?

Roger Sitkins:

Things are good enough.

Brent Kelly:

Yeah. I mean, so that's just one of those mindsets that I think with growth that gets in people's way. And here's the other thing, it's the last thing I'm going to share. I can get on my soap box for a while on this one. But I've gotten, many of you know, Roger, you certainly know that I've got five kiddos. Now, my oldest couple are pretty much, well, pretty close at least, to stop physically growing. But my other kids, my 11-year-old, and my eight-year-old and my three-year-old, what I've noticed, this is some magical thing, Roger, you've experienced this too, is that if you give them food and water, they need bigger shoes and clothes, right?

Brent Kelly:

They physically grow and that happens physically for a while. But then what happens? When we hit adult, we stopped growing. And I think there's a very similar analogy that happens to insurance professionals. That I automatically got some stuff, I went to a class, I did this and then they just stop the growth. I am what I am. And it's one of the biggest frustrations, because this is something that and again, I can talk about a lot of aspects, but for producers. I always say this, you've heard me say this, as you get better and hopefully you're getting better, shouldn't your clients get better, right? I mean, it's that constant thing that I want to grow into some place that I'm not yet versus, "Well, I guess this is where it is. So I know you probably have some thoughts on that.

Roger Sitkins:

It's just your class have got to get better. Maybe they think of this in reverse, I mean that's where you're going. You've got to get better to get better clients. Gee, I wish I could write larger accounts. Okay. We always do the Q and A, share it with everybody here, after their formal part of the producer training, we normally stand for 30 minutes and just ask questions. And one of them was from a very interesting guy.

Roger Sitkins:

We won't go into that right now, but just changing careers was amazing. And he started talking about, "How do I do this? How do I do that?" And I said, "Well, the first thing you've got to do is do the research to understand what the real problems and concerns are in that type of business. Don't just go in going, 'I'm a general practitioner and I've got a yellow legal pad, or maybe I've just got my iPad and I'm taking some notes on it and asking copious questions.'"

Roger Sitkins:

I said, "Just spend an hour a week..." I really he rather do an hour a day because he's brand new producer, "Spend an hour a week studying the underwriting problems and concerns for X class of business." "Well, how do I find that?" I said, "Have you ever heard of the big G, Google? Google underwriting problems and concerns on mechanical contractors and you'll get all the information." So you don't earn the bigger accounts until you learn more about them, so that you then are worth more to them. Because at the end of the day, this 1% difference, so much of it just what's the value you bring them?

Roger Sitkins:

One of our best producers in our Sales Mastery Program, as you know our Elite 50 Program, had this just great mindset. He said, "I don't worry about price. I don't even, quite frankly, worry about coverages that much because I'm a specialist and most of the programs are pretty much the same. My question is, how do I bring more value to this client and help them move their business forward?" And that's what he talks about. Because as we know, you're talking about just relationships overall. With your best relationships, insurance is the last thing you talk about. With your worst relationships, insurance is the first and only thing you talk about. Think about that.

Brent Kelly:

One more thing before I get the number four, but I love this discussion. And I heard this years ago and this may be a Maxwell thing too or affiliated somewhere, but it's powerful. And when I first heard it, I'm like, "Yeah, okay." But it said this, that we don't attract what we want, we attract who we are. And I was like, okay, this is not just old foo-foo. But the point of it was, what I understood and now I get better and I see, as a coach and in my own life, is that you said, Roger, when you get better at your skill, your craft, your game, your profession, suddenly people that are higher level are attracted to you because they see it and you communicate it better.

Brent Kelly:

And guess what else? You're more confident when you're doing these things. And people of higher levels want to be around people who are confident in what they're doing and the value they bring versus, "Gosh, I hope, I hope it's okay that I'm here right now." So it's just a really important concept of just that growth mentality. But you've got to start wherever you're at, you start, but start that growth process. And it never ends, which should be exciting.

Roger Sitkins:

Yeah, rather than the producer that walks in and says, "I'm not worthy. I'm just so lucky to be here. Thank you so much for accepting an appointment with me." Oh my God, put yourself in a losing situation, starting the first second you walk in the door or they're making their phone calls. They're going, "God, I hope they don't answer."

Brent Kelly:

And here's one thing for the audience too. And this is common sense, but it's like, "Well, gosh, I wish I could be more confident." I mean, people could say it about whether it's you or me, if we're speaking somewhere, it could be anybody who's good at what they do. Well, I guess good for them. Well, guess what? You only get confidence by the hard work and preparation practice. And when you put the time and effort in, you're not going to be perfect, but boy, you feel like you've earned the right to be there. And there's a difference in what people feel when in your presence. So, all right, my last thing. Number four, we're going deep with these, Roger, but it's fun. Number four is integrity mindset. What is integrity mindset? I know this has been really impactful to you lately. So tell the audience about integrity.

Roger Sitkins:

Well, integrity to me, is really simple. Are you keeping your word? Are you doing what you said you were going to? I just finished a series with Pastor Andy Stanley on this topics of a month long series. And it was about life overall. But it just, it hit me so much, the fact that when you think of integrity, it's pretty simple. It's, are you doing what you said you were going to do? And do people view you as a person with integrity? I know we mentioned this at least once before on the podcast, but two years ago now, just March 13th or 14th when COVID unfortunately closed the world down and we were having our live event with our network members.

Roger Sitkins:

And that next morning, the second morning of it, as I was doing my debrief of the previous day and brief of the day and getting ready because I owe it to our clients to be ready and it hit me, this question about integrity and accountability. And I just I walked in and my opening other than, "Hey, great to see you all again. Great day yesterday. What if everybody in your agency did everything they said they were going to do? How great would your agency be?" Of course people started going, "Oh wow." And so many people commented, "Well, that's my frustration. That's what drives me crazy."

Roger Sitkins:

And so when you get to people, first of all, leaders have to lead. it can't be where like your kids say, "Well, yeah, your room doesn't look so good either." Okay? Or you left your bike in the driveway type thing, but people with integrity do what they say they're going to do. And it's not a perfect world. And if it was a perfect world, they'd be trained monkeys, or robots, or whatever, running around doing all of the work. But if you could just get an attitude within your agency, that people realize that we are an agency that operates under an integrity model, to all of those relationships we've talked about. When we make a promise, we keep it.

Roger Sitkins:

And that's like with the best accounts that our agents work with. We say, "Look, don't do a stewardship report because a stewardship report turns into a, here's every transaction we've done for you and the client looks at it and they say, 'What? That's just what I expect you to do. What did you do different?'" So a promise report ties back to, here are the promises we made, here's how we kept them. Here's what we did. So here's the risk management plan we had in place for you, all of the services and here's exactly what happened on them. That's a promise report. So just think of the subtle difference.

Roger Sitkins:

First of all, I wonder how many people are doing a stewardship report or whatever you want to call it on at least the top 20% of their customers that are 80% of their revenue. It's a pretty low percent. And then people wonder why, "Gee, I wonder why that client doesn't remember everything I did for them?" Because they're busy running their own business. You've got to remind them. Well, it's the same thing here. Think about this, what if every time you sent something to a client, future ideal client, center of influence, carrier, team member, wherever, when you told somebody you were going to do it, what if it started off something like this? "Dear Brent, as promised, please find... As promised, please find..."

Roger Sitkins:

What does that say about your organization overall? Are you a promise keeping organization? This is also going to come back though the integrity with yourself and we can certainly go all the personal things with our families, our loved ones, our churches, our community and integrity, anything we've said. But just go back and look in the mirror. And this is again, what we said earlier today, was that stop negotiating with your best version possible. Make a promise to yourself and keep the promise, okay? Little things like did you debrief last week, pre-brief this week?

Roger Sitkins:

And what promises have you made to yourself are the things you will accomplish this week? I mean, we can go hours on this. But at the end of the day, it's really simple. First of all, are you willing to make a commitment that you'll do what you said you're going to do? And people realize your personal brand that people say, "You know what? That's someone that always does what they said they were going to do, or if they can't do it for whatever reason, they communicate that to me upfront." And if you think about every, well, I won't say every, you can't say every.

Roger Sitkins:

The majority of frustrations you have with others, or lack of a relationship for whatever reason, or a relationship breaks up, I just see that a high percent of them are because somebody didn't maintain integrity. Somebody didn't maintain their integrity. So again, just think, what if 100% of the people did at least 80% of what they said they were going to do? By the way, life as a leader is a lot easier. Well, those of you that are producers, individuals, guess what? You've got to become that self-managed producer, with self-managed and accountable to yourself. And by the way, an accountability partner, Brent?

Brent Kelly:

The phrase that comes to me, I heard this a while back to you too, it says, "No trust, no nothing." And it is true. I mean, I think, and I'm not going to go off any rails here, political or any of that. But just an overall leadership of everything, to me, the lack of trust from all different angles. And if you don't have it, nothing that anyone says or does matters. I mean, really, because you're like, "Oh, I don't know. Don't trust that, don't trust that." And this again, it comes from all different angles.

Brent Kelly:

And I think the one thing that you said, Roger, that I mean, you said a lot of great things, but what really stood out is, what I wrote down is, own it, just own it. And it is not always fun. And I struggle with this too. It's like, well, it'd be easier to kind of massage the truth, or extrapolate some things, or whatever it is. But the truth of it is, I didn't do it. And I will tell you what, I know for me, I don't know for you, Roger, but when I hear a leader, again, not that you need to do what you said you're going to do.

Brent Kelly:

But we are human, we do fall short and we do make mistakes. And so when I hear a leader say, and you've done this, Roger, in our team and I've done it too in different ways. But it's like when you say, "Listen, I dropped the ball on this, it's on me." To me, that is one of the most empowering things that I can hear from a leader. And it's because listen, this is a person that they've got commitments, but when they fall short, I'll know where they have. And they'll be honest with me because I know they care enough about the company, and our team, and our clients to make sure that they're going to own it. So anything you want to add to that, Roger?

Roger Sitkins:

I mean, it comes back to don't justify why you didn't do it. And maybe a better way of looking at this, Brent, the guard rails, maybe the sponsor and the guard rails, a sign on the guard rail should say integrity. So when you think about the promises you've made, and when you think about things that become the non-optional behaviors and strategies, and if you're getting close to the guard rail, maybe you see the sign that says, oops, integrity. I'm not going to be doing what I said I was going to do. And you don't have to make a lot of promises, you just have to keep the ones that you make.

Roger Sitkins:

And the things where, we've all done it, "Oh, that's a great idea. That's a great idea. That's a great idea." And we talk about this a lot, that there are always more great ideas than there is time or capacity to execute them, okay? That's the trivial many. Determine the things in all areas of your life that will be the vital few. And we wind up focusing on fewer things, but our execution and our results are much greater. So that's our concept of, within the agency world, delivering excellence in every process, going deep, okay?

Brent Kelly:

Well, I'm going to transition to the fifth one because actually, as you were saying that it hit me. It's obviously, you got to keep your own word and don't lie to yourself. But obviously, what happens too out in the marketplace or in agencies in particular, is that maybe it's sometimes not done out of malice, but it's done because, "Oh, we can do this or that can happen and we can do that." And sometimes we're making promises and doing things that we really can't deliver. We haven't told the people that need to help us deliver. So I heard that and it takes me to number five, which is a mindset of alignment. Alignment mindset. So, Roger, what does that mean?

Roger Sitkins:

Yeah, we could make the case that this one would cover a lot of different areas because it does. Alignment to me, is pretty simple. And it's just like looking at a car, is it aligned? And we've all seen maybe a little bit older car, junkie car going down the road and you can see that the tires might be going this way, but the body and the car is turned, so reality is the car is totally out of align, or you hit a pothole or you hit a curb or something and the car gets out of alignment. Well, if you don't straighten it out right away, what happens? Well, number one, you wear the tires out much quicker. Number two, you can affect the suspension overall, et cetera, et cetera.

Roger Sitkins:

And so what we see all too often now is that we don't have absolute alignment on exactly where the organization is going. So think of a fancy race car, think of just a regular car or pickup truck. I don't care what it is, a vehicle with four wheels. So what are the four wheels, if you will of alignment? Well, I think it's certainly sales, service, leadership, and then administrative and internal operations. So sales, service, leadership, and admin and ops. So if those four going along together, pretty darn good results. Once they get out of line and people lose trust, or people make promises they don't keep, or let's say a producer makes a promise to a client and doesn't tell the service team about the promise they've made. And then the account gets goofed up and who gets blamed? The service team, but they didn't even know it.

Roger Sitkins:

When we can get an alignment where people are saying, Okay, where are we going?" And this comes back to one of the things, Brent, that you've added a couple of years, right, maybe two years ago now. They've been so impactful with our account manager program. It's the fact that the producers come in and they hear the story and they go, "Great, green zone. I got it, I got it. Time spent selling, got it." But the service team had never really heard the message at the same level, nor understood it deep enough. So now what we find, like tomorrow we've got the account manager program with the producers that just started yesterday because we want them to hear the same message, we want them to understand it.

Roger Sitkins:

But at the end of the day, this is the powerful thing, the saying you had, it's simple but powerful, which I love of course. Is that, we have the same goal, but different roles. Well, the same goal should be very simple, ROI, retaining and obtaining ideal clients. If you've listened to the podcast, all of you heard it 517 times, retain and obtain ideal clients, all right? What are the different roles? Well, there's a sales role, there's a service role, there's a leadership role, and there's an administrative and ops role. Are we getting together and just talking about that?

Roger Sitkins:

For the agency overall, is there a monthly state of the agency meeting and alignment as a topic? Okay, where are we out of line? Where are we lined up, okay? The producer and their service partner or partners, are you having a weekly high-performance team meeting with a set agenda that's reviewed? If not, you're out of alignment. Did you do your debrief and pre-brief? Did you debrief last week, pre-brief this week? Have you talked with your service partner, where you're going? Have you talked what you need? Have they shared with you what they need? If there's not alignment, then people show up, good intentions, hysterical activity takes over.

Roger Sitkins:

The end of the week they say, "God, I was busy." And then you say, "How many appointments did you have, producer?" "Three." Three? Three? Okay, what did you do the rest of the week? Well, I had stuff. Well, what were the plans? What did you do? I was busy, okay? And then once they get out of alignment, now we start having this between sales and service. And if you've got this conflict, those of you that are listening, I'm knocking my fists together. If you have sales and service in conflict on a regular basis, number one, there is no same goal, different roles. There's been no discussion about the roles. One of the great pictures that we use within the account manager and producer programs is the race cars, a top-down view of the race car in a pit. And whether 14 or 17-

Brent Kelly:

17, I think, 17.

Roger Sitkins:

17 people between putting gas on, putting tires on, et cetera, so that car can get done like a five second pit stop. Fuel, and gas, or fuel, tires and they're out there again, it's an indie racing car, so you can really see all four of them. And it's such a great analogy of what are we doing as a team to get all the fuel, all the tires, everything that's needed on the vehicle and quickly? And this is also the whole concept about, will it make the boat go faster? That British rowing team that never finished higher than seventh in any international competition, but they took on one thing, everything they talked about, will it make the boat go faster? That to me, is alignment because everybody's talking about the same thing.

Roger Sitkins:

And then they wound up, guess what? They won the gold medal in the Olympics. They've never been higher than seventh, their one change... In fact, they have a book about it, you can look it up, Will It Make The Boat Go Faster? It's an amazing thing. Don't try to do everything. Get people aligned, doing a few things exceedingly well, all right? So that's an alignment mentality or mindset. And leaders ask themselves, "Are my teams aligned? Everybody on my team..." College football, we had a playbook. Well, we had offense and defense. But we had a playbook. We didn't have, you guys have your playbook, we'll have our playbook. That's an aligned playbook. Most agencies don't have a playbook.

Brent Kelly:

Yeah, and in your playbook, I'm assuming there was a quarterback that had a job, and a running back, and had a job, and an offensive lineman that had a job, and a wide receiver that had a job, or whatever it was, right, for those plays. And the goal, my guess is you didn't design plays to go backwards-

Roger Sitkins:

We never triple played a drop back and fumble.

Brent Kelly:

Yeah. So I mean it's like, that's the goal, now we've got these different roles. And I know we use that tongue in cheek, but it is so true in agencies. I mean, in some cases, like you said, the butting heads and I'm using my hands now too, is that in some cases we may have, if you want to make the producer the quarterback, I'm not saying they are, but they're there, and the offensive lineman is the service team and service team's like, "Olé."

Roger Sitkins:

The lookout black. The lookout-

Brent Kelly:

Go have it, right? Because there's no alignment, no communication and that's important. I just want to, a couple of things you said there, and this is something that you said to me a couple of years ago, after a chiropractic visit. Now, my back has been bothering me, I have them too, and this is what you said, right? Even a small adjustment can make a big difference, right? Even a small adjustment. So I'm thinking too, and you've talked about those four wheels, even if one wheel of the four is a little off, it messes everything up. And just have that conversation, have that dialogue.

Roger Sitkins:

It's the 1%. What if just one wheel is 1% off and you continue on that, how long before that tire wears out? And most of us have had that happen at some point, where we didn't know about it.

Brent Kelly:

Yeah. It's important stuff. Last thing I'll share, I want to get some final thoughts from you, just overall, have you summarize mindset. And I want to go first, just a couple of things. First of all, I do want to share this and now we've launched our programs, but we still have an open invitation to our all inclusive model, Sitkins Network and our ProFit Experience. And we continue to embrace and enhance that experience to even higher levels. In fact, now, Roger, obviously you're very well of this, not only do we have complete access to the entire agency, but we're adding deep dives where we take an agency through specific area after they hear the core program of everything and all of the different things.

Brent Kelly:

And I do want to go back to the clarity and core, which is the first phase of our ProFit Experience, because a big part of that, and we just talked about it, is allowing your entire agency to hear and be part of a similar message. That is part of the culture, it's part of the buy-in. And it's just one of those things where we don't have the producers running off in this direction, charging with the service team, getting dragged along to some degree, right? And we're not having it. Everyone understands that there's a common purpose and a vision. Ultimately, it's your agency's purpose and vision, but we want to help you through our programs and through our Sitkins Network model and the ProFit Experience, to help you accelerate. And the word that you use, Roger, I love, is compress time.

Brent Kelly:

We want to help you compress time in that. So if you're interested in learning more about that, again, we would love to see if it's a fit for your agency. sitkins.com/aim and that's our all-inclusive model. It's got all the information there. We've got some really cool stuff coming in the works as well. My last comment on this, and I'll turn to Roger, is this and I wrote this down for some reason, because I was thinking, how do you get started in mindset? I'm listening to Roger, and Brent said some things, and a lot of good things, but where do I start this stuff? And it hit me. And I had a coach, years ago kind of say this, is that we are human beings before we're human doings. And so you think about that.

Brent Kelly:

I guess my question is this, I was looking to relationship, productivity, growth, integrity, alignment. My question to you, as a listener is, who are you going to be in these areas? Who are you going to be? And to me, that starts off waking up the day, and of course, we've talked about morning routines. But thinking about that, who am I going to be in relationships? Who am I going to be in productivity? Who am I going to be in a mindset of growth? Who am I going to be in keeping my word? Who am I going to be in aligning with people around me before I do? So, that just hit me. I don't know if that makes a lot of sense or not. But I think it starts with that, understanding of that, of who I'm going to be, then going out and doing the things you said you were going to be. So, Roger, what are some final thoughts from you?

Roger Sitkins:

Well, I mean, at the end of the day, it's a very small percent that will do what we talk about. Sorry, it's reality. 80% of agencies are going to do fine, whether they ever come to one of our programs or not. They would be semi successful. And one of the things we talk about, look, if your ultimate goal is regret, stay the course, because at the end of the career, you're going to say, "I could have been a lot better." And maybe have other investments that are going to really operate well for you. The next 18% of agencies have an awareness now, they're aware that there's a best version out there. There's an awareness that every $100,000 of unrealized profit that they don't get because of unrealized revenue, bad expense control, et cetera. But at the end of the day, unrealized profit. Every $100,000 right now is worth at least 1.4 million of revenue.

Roger Sitkins:

So I look at this and I say, "What strategic hire could I make in an agency that would make a big difference?" Well, I'm going to be very blatant here, hire a coach, whether it's us or someone else, hire a coach. Because a coach is going to cost you way less than 50% of the cost of one employee. And I can guarantee you this much, you work with us, you're going to increase your personal net worth by at least a million dollars a year. And that sounds like a trite number and people throw the number out. It's really simple. It's a $100,000 of increased profit. What about 200? What about 300? What about 400, okay?

Roger Sitkins:

So take a look at it because it may not be for you, but what we're looking for, the 18% of agencies that have an awareness, that says, "You know what? I want to get to the top 2%." Something I learned, Brent, early, early, early in my coaching career, I'm not even sure where I read the study, but it said that only 2% of people can make long-term meaningful change. So that's who we're looking for. We want the 18% that want to be the 2%. So much of this comes back to mindset. And when I was preparing for this last night and reviewing this morning, I said, "Good idea, what's the definition of mindset?" And it says, "It's the established set of attitudes by someone." Mindset is really an attitude and I'll say it again. It's the established set of attitudes by someone. So if your attitude is, "I'm okay," that's your mindset.

Roger Sitkins:

If your attitude is, "No, there's a best version possible of me sitting out there waiting for me to arrive." That's your mindset, okay? If your attitude starts becoming, "You know what? I got to stop negotiating with myself. I've got to go do these things." It's your mindset. One, and I think we talked about this the other day too, one of the sales managers that just finished our program, on his cell phone, I'll grab my cell phone here. Got my cell phone. On the screensaver, he took off his family picture. I said, "What's going on?" He said, "No, I've got something I got to show you." And on the screen it says, "Why not me? Why not me?" And he said, "Coach, just that thing you shared with me three weeks ago has caused so many great changes in my mind." So I would challenge all the listeners here, why not you? Why not you? Why don't you get the right attitude?

Roger Sitkins:

It's an attitude of growth. It's an attitude of gratitude that you realize how lucky you are to have this great career, this great business. And the things you can do to impact your world and others' worlds by doing the things you know should do. So the attitude is going to be, I would hope, it's an attitude of integrity. I'm going to do what I said I was going to do. But I'm going to challenge myself to no longer, certainly not be in the 80 percenters, they won't do anything. That's fine. But the 18% that say what? You know what? I want to become a 2 percenter, those are the ones we want to work with. If that sounds like you, let's have a conversation.

Brent Kelly:

The ProFit Experience that we have set up, and I say this at the beginning, I say it in every podcast, there's a reason behind it. I don't say it because it's just fun or trite, it's true. It's the fact that it's about clarity and helping agencies get really clear on what is it you really want? And clear on, where am I, really? And how did I get here? That's like one of the first steps. And then of course, then where are you going to go with that? And which builds into consistency. And you said it a million times, the vital few versus the trivial many. Let's just find the vital few things that were going to be really consistent with and actually do, which by the way, requires what? Commitment.

Roger Sitkins:

It's the commitment to the Sitkins Seven, which we'll kind of leave them hanging with that.

Brent Kelly:

Yeah. I mean, and there's some things. I wasn't going to share one more thing, but gosh, darn it, Roger, you triggered another thought and it applies directly. And you know how much I love using Jim Rohn, R-O-H-N, his quotes. And when you said attitude it hit back and I would even go further that and say, what's your philosophy? And somebody said-

Roger Sitkins:

Oh, bigger word.

Brent Kelly:

Something that he'd said, and man, as you were saying that I'm like, "Well, there is so much truth to this." Here's what he said and I think it's just so good. He said, "Our philosophy determines our attitude. Our attitude will determine our actions. Our actions will determine results. And our results will determine our lifestyle." And so I love what he said, is, "If you don't like your lifestyle, look at your results. If you don't like your results, look at your actions. If you don't like your actions, look at your attitude. If you don't like your attitude, look at your philosophy."

Brent Kelly:

So the last thing I'll lead you with, what's your philosophy, and how important will that be to your success? So with that, Roger, thank you for taking... We had a great conversation and I know the listeners are better for it, the viewers are better for it. We appreciate it. To all the agency leaders out there, I wish you all the best to your success. Thanks for listening and watching.

 

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