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Be Like Mike Malinowski of EHD Insurance Agency

 

 

Brent Kelly:

Welcome to the Agent Leader podcast. My name is Brent Kelly. I am your host. I'm excited to be with you today and I have an exceptional guest. And if you're watching on YouTube or on video, you can see us as we are in the windows right now. Mike Malinowski, who's the president and CEO of EHD Insurance. We'll be joining us. I'll make sure Mike gets a formal introduction here in a minute, but excited to have Mike on. I know he'll share some great ideas, struggles, challenges, and successes that they've had of a very successful agency and his role as president and CEO. Also want to remind you, the purpose of this podcast is always to help educate and power and equip you the independent insurance agency leader to become your best version possible. And as a reminder, I've mentioned this on other podcasts, the best version possible Fast Track, a 90-day process and plan for your agency is officially being rolled out in January. So I'll say this ahead of time before we introduce Mike. If you want to be like Mike, sorry Mike, I couldn't resist and work with us as an organization, the fast track is a great way to get started. It's a 90-day process. And then from there you can decide what you want to do to move forward. So go to sitkins.com/fasttrack to learn more. Now with that, I want to get into today's podcast and my incredible guest. I mentioned Mike Malinowski with EHD Insurance. Mike, welcome to the Agent Leader podcast.

Mike Malinowski:

Thank you, Brent. Great to be here. Thanks for having me.

Brent Kelly:

Awesome. Well, again, there's a lot of things we're going to touch on today and you as an agency have been with us as a partner and we love the relationship for five plus years now, looking back of our work together. So it's been a while and obviously lots of learning on both sides and growth along the way and all the challenges and things that you're going through. So can't wait for you to share some of that. But before we get into some of the challenges and successes, just for the audience, Mike, if you could give a little background or bio on certainly your role and how you got to your role and as well as EHD as an organization.

Mike Malinowski:

Oh, thanks Brent. Well, yeah, I've been in the insurance business after graduating college since 1995. Started with the carrier and through that I worked a little bit with government and that's how I met EHD. So I've been with EHD for 18 years. I started off as a producer out doing the things that producers do. I learned the business from the ground up and it's been a great experience. It's a great company, a great culture. And right after six months being here, I knew this was a place I wanted to grow and continue to grow it. So yeah, as an agency, we're doing pretty well. We're very proud of still being privately held and independently owned. That's a big point of differentiation for us. How's that sound, Graham, for a pod for us? So we like that and we're in our hundred 27th year in business.

So here in pretty much a Commonwealth, PA. We used to look at ourself as regional offices, but now we look at ourself pretty much as a large regional broker throughout the whole commonwealth and not just in particular areas of the state. So we surpassed 30 million last year, so we're pretty proud of that. Continuing to grow hopefully to 40 and 50 million and keep this train rolling. So do the full gamut of benefits, largest 68% of our business, property casualty benefits and personal lines. So it's been great for us to continue to just do what we do, have fun doing it and really help clients and customers. It's important because the old corny saying is premium's only important the day you pay it? But actually helping customers and business owners through what's been rough times over the last several years has been a great differentiator for us. And we do. We take a great pride in it. So it's been a blessing for us as an agency to be so involved in our community. So hopefully we can keep this thing going.

Brent Kelly:

Yeah, thanks Mike. And I'll just say this, I've been out at your place several times now in different events and obviously some of the trainings that we've done, but we talk about at Sitkins is culture, what is culture? Well, it's the language and behaviors that are normal in your agency and no agency culture is perfect. I know Mike, you and EHD are always trying to improve and grow the culture in positive ways. But I'll say it's one thing you mentioned that when you were there six months, like, hey, this is the place I want to be. There's something really special about EHD and what you guys do, and you can just see it in the feel when you're in the building around the people. So I want to applaud you certainly for you, I know it wasn't just you, Mike, but as an entire organization, what you've all done to establish that culture.

Now that I said all that positive stuff, I'm going to ask you the challenge question. This is the first question I always ask my guests. Listen and we could probably be here all day about, Hey Mike, share some challenges you're facing as an agency. There's many, but if you could, certainly in today's climate, and we're all dealing with different stuff with market conditions and everything else going on, we know that. I'm curious just from your perspective, Mike, what do you believe are some of the biggest challenges that EHD is facing today and what are you doing to address those?

Mike Malinowski:

Yeah, well that's a great question. I mean, from a corporate level, I guess perpetuation is always the number one challenge to be able to meet our obligations to prior shareholders and perpetuate the company long-term and doing that long range planning, which is this day and age when you have a hundred year pandemic, you have this type of inflation. It's tough,

It's really tough. And to continue to concentrate then on the day-to-day, blocking and tackling stuff of writing and retaining customers and the pipeline and continuing to develop a pipeline to find the right talent as every agency I think is looking at and how we continue to focus on recruiting the right people to the agency. And our hiring process can be lengthy and there's a reason for that because we want to pick the right people and that can create some challenges for us. But that's probably one of our most challenging thing is just if we want to continue to meet our growth goals, our sales velocity goals and things of that nature, we got to find the right talent and develop them and train them and not just when I started you got to pencil and said Go right. Business is how we help the younger generation.

There's such a huge opportunity for the younger generation to get into our business and we're really trying to attack that through several measures, but perpetuating and stuff, we talk to you about Brent all the time, pipeline development, pipeline development, and it's a hard business. You got to work hard. I put that in every single email I think is you got to work hard and the right stuff will come, but we'll continue to try to address those challenges and develop our people both organically and try to find some people out there that want to come to a privately held agency.

Brent Kelly:

Yeah, Mike, that's a great point. We talk about all the time and with leaders out there, I mean hopefully this isn't cliche, but many cases you're not even in the insurance business. You really are in the people development business. And obviously those things overlap, but it's one of those things that's not an easy thing to do. And my joke, Mike, which isn't a very good joke, is that leadership would be really easy if it wasn't for the darn people because again, there's different backgrounds and experiences and all that. And again, certainly like I said, you go through a pandemic, there's a lot of challenge with that and how do we reestablish culture and all those things. But I guess part of this too, Mike, when you're talking about people development, and I think it hits me maybe, I don't know if this analogy will relate to you or not, I may have mentioned it before in different discussions we've had, but I said it's a lot like college recruiting today, in my opinion.

And I know you just said you were in State College, right? With Penn State just recently, and there are pretty big size programs certainly, but you just think in general terms about college athletics, you've got to recruit. And now with NIL, certainly there's money factors involved just like you're dealing with talent and you've got the transfer report. So it's not about just getting people in, but then it's developing them and retaining. And again, this may be a pretty wide open question, but I'm just curious what things maybe have you done as an organization, EHD to help in those ways? Because not easy people are trying to get the same talent you are and they're trying to pick off some of the talent that you've grown.

Mike Malinowski:

Yeah, I think Brent, and we've probably talked about this is almost as we look at clients like future ideal clients, we need to look at recruiting the same way, just as you mentioned as a college program needs to recruit is sometimes I think of the leadership group. We're so concentrated on the numbers and the day-to-day stuff where we talk about behaviors. So we should have those same behaviors when we're going out to recruit folks. And quite frankly, the one thing that we were lacking on and we're trying to address is we never had a formal internship program. So we just started that. And to tell you, we had our first internship program, and guess what? We're hiring the kid who's graduating by the way from state college in December who's going to walk into a sales role who was with us through our first internship program.

So that's one of the ways we're trying to address it. We did experiment with the producer academy internally. We had three recent college grads go through that. So we're really trying to concentrate on some organic ways to develop the folks through the internship program. But you're right, we always worry about some of our best producers, how we lock them up, make them feel comfortable so they're not flying ship, going through the transfer portal looking just like we always say, right, your best client is someone else's best prospect. Your best producer is someone else to come in, offer more money. So you have to make sure you're creating a culture and rewarding them for their hard work. So yeah, I think that's a challenge in this day and age that we'll have to continue to deal with. But as I said, and you mentioned just continuing to try to attract the younger generation to get who I think from a technology and all the things they do can really provide some value to business owners and customers most important.

Brent Kelly:

It certainly is that awareness. And a lot of this too, Mike, and you're talking about and we're talking about the college example there, but there is so much truth to that. And I think going back to the culture world, it's interesting. I just was looking at some studies and there was a couple of different studies, so I don't remember the exact numbers, but somewhere around a third of millennials, and again, millennials is the primary portion of the workforce. Of course now we're getting in a generation Z, I think that's the next one. I can't keep track of it anymore, quite frankly, Mike. But anyway, they were just talking about as far as benefits, and they really do. There's a substantial amount of millennials in the next generation behind that that are saying, Hey, the thing that I'm really looking for is growth and development, who can help provide some of that, right?

That feeling of I want to be somewhere where I can grow and develop. Of course there's some that probably don't want to do that, but you don't want them anyway, but of the ones you want, it's like, Hey, listen, the question I always ask agencies is if someone came to you and said, listen, how will I get better? What are my development growth opportunities in the next year? And maybe someone's offering more money, but they know there's a better longer path with another organization like EHD. So I think that's fantastic. I want to flip a little bit, obviously we talked about the challenges, but you've had some great successes too. And I know Mike, I've known you long enough that you're not going to sit on here and brag and brag and brag, although you could. But I would like if you could highlight a success or two that you would say, Hey, listen, I'm really proud of what we accomplished here and I know some other agency leaders listening could go, Hey, that's something we could think about or consider or maybe do at a higher level. So what's an area that you're really proud of Mike, at the agency?

Mike Malinowski:

Well, I mean one of them to start with, I think as is when I got first into the COO position, the prior CEO, who was a great mentor and leader for us, I wanted to fix our special business process unit. And I think that has really helped the agency grow and turn into more of a sales culture than before. We really, and the leadership, Lori Keohane who leads that department of us just done a fantastic job, but we wanted to separate that business. It's extremely important. The whole world is made up of small businesses, but it's a wholly different sales process really than it is that when you get into the larger commercial clients. So I'm very proud because that was a big culture change to tell producers that they can't work on something because of a certain revenue size or it needed to go to another unit.

They know what they're doing, they know how to handle it, they know how to quote it, they know how to talk the language, and it's a little more commodity driven if we're honest with each other and we've made that unit efficient and technology driven, be able to talk to small business owners where when you're talking to CEOs of larger companies, it's different conversations. So it took us some time to get there, but I'm really proud of our leadership team. We stuck by it. Now, producers come on board, they don't know any other way. This is the way we do it. So that was, I think a tremendous accomplishment for us because it was really tough culture change and helped build us to being more of a sales organization. And I can sit here and see it was a concept that was a strategy, and the team just did a great job all around of putting it in place. And I think that's helped freed up our larger commercial producers to really go after some of the accounts where we bring a lot of resources that we think we fit really, really good at. So that's one brand I would've to comment on,

Brent Kelly:

And I want to speak on that because we've had some conversations with other people in your leadership team. And a couple of things I want to highlight and for the listeners, I mean, you said improving the sales culture. Well, there's that culture word again, right? And I know we've talked about this, Mike, one of the pros of being a long established agency, we say 126 years?

Mike Malinowski:

Yeah, 127,

Brent Kelly:

Right? There's credibility and relationships are great. The challenge could be have we kind of morphed into kind of just a service culture? And we've just been around a long time. And again, there's some pros to that, but certainly within the culture, if we're not careful, then we stop growing, which again, you're either growing or you're dying. I mean, no, we're just going to hang out here for a few years. So I think that's a testament certainly to your entire leadership team because it's also something with culture that doesn't happen overnight. This isn't like, Hey, we're going to have a big meeting. By the way, we're now officially a sales culture. Congratulations.

Mike Malinowski:

It took some time and you've seen it Brent, through the last five years that you guys have been involved. So you're a big part of that. And I'm not saying it's because we're looking at each other, it's the truth. That was the first step to do that, and we're continuing to try to do that and even our personalized departments or then look at stuff a little differently to grow that. But it does. It takes time. And if you just sit on the service business, which was very successful for us for a while, but then the way the world works, if to your point, if you're not growing in this business, you're not going to be privately held and independently owned anymore. That's just the reality of our insurance world. So yeah, it's been a tribute to the whole team, but it does. You can't just snap your finger and say, oh, we're going to be sales group now. Just doesn't work that way.

Brent Kelly:

And I do want to get a little more feedback. You mentioned on the minimum account size of raising that standard for the producers and of course part of that building in that business unit, select business unit behind it to take care of a lot of that. But listen, I wasn't around for a lot of that, but I heard some of the conversations. There's some rumbling when you're going to say, well, I can only write that now. And consistent pushback. And one of the things that we talk about all the time, and Mike, you've heard this a million times from us, obviously the power of 80/20 and understanding that predictable imbalance. We've never seen at this point, again, someone could try to prove me wrong, which I'm open to hearing, but those producers or agencies that have begun to trade down, whether to a select business unit like you've done or somewhere else, even to younger producers or what have you that have lost money in the process, what typically happens is they become more efficient, they become more aware, they raise their skill game, working on the right type of accounts.

As you said it, I forgot exactly how you word it, but there's that, you said the smaller business, as much as we love them, it's just different selling process and it is more of a commodity. And I know in having conversations with your organization, as you guys have moved up the ladder so to speak, and saying, listen, we really need to only work on these accounts. Your producers not only have done better financially, but they've been much better in closing ratio and the conversations that they've had. But I do want you to speak on, because I know there's leaders that go, oh, that's easy for Mike and his team because they're 30 million and they've been around for a while and whatever. Which by the way, any agency can make these culture change. But how did you as an agency overcome some of that pushback from the producers? You're like, I don't want to do this. We've never done it this way before. How dare you, right? I mean, that's some of the conversations to some degree, right?

Mike Malinowski:

Oh yeah. Well, it's like anything else. As a leader, we always talk about, you want to be a manager, you want to be a leader? And you have to lead the people for them to understand why it benefits them. Not only just because Mike's sitting in this chair and wants it done so they can go out and concentrate on what we're paying them to do, and they can all do well at it, as we call it SBU. And if there was an article that was just put out, I don't know if you read it, I don't want to give a commercial to one of the evaluators, but I sent it to our small business department head and she was like, this is unbelievable. It's like they interviewed EHD about what to do and how to create a special business unit. It was kind of comical.

But yeah, we got a lot of rumblings. Oh, well, I'm going to round out the account and it's going to be over the minimum threshold. And we're like, no, then go get the whole thing. And just from how they get paid and from a commission standpoint, we just had to show them like this, we're doing this for a reason to help you be better, to be your best virgin possible. And it really helped, I think the special business unit, our small business guys and gals really be able to concentrate what was their role, go to attack all those small businesses and do it the right way, gain relationships there and have the other folks work on a lot of stuff. Yeah, there was some rumblings, but we had good leaders that would say, no, we're not bending. This is the way it's going to be. And once they see their year end commission statement, they thought, oh, you know what? This is pretty good. And I'm not working on a book of business. And some of our top producers will tell you is, do you want 150 accounts that pay a million dollar book of business or do you want 20? And that's just kind of how they were like, oh, you know what? You're right. I'd rather not have to worry about that many accounts. So.

Brent Kelly:

It's such a great point. And again, it's something we talk about all the time. And I mean, my quick analogy is you want a hundred pennies or four quarters right in your pocket, and some people say, well, give me a couple of dimes too. Fine, whatever. Have a few dimes. But the idea, again, the mindset is so important. I think the thing that you stress that I really want to highlight, Mike, this goes back to leadership and developing your people, is that this is not a, Hey, we're out to get you and want to chastise you or take away accounts, or it's like, no, we want you to grow to your fullest potential to have you the most freedom possible. And the way that you're going is not going to get you there. I want to help you. Does it grow the agency? Of course it does. But here's the other thing too that hopefully agency leaders listening will see is no one is that free up sales capacity for the producers that need to be out doing producer stuff, but writing the better sized accounts, the better relationship also frees up service capacity. You've got to select business unit. Now, Mike that does that, but I guarantee your account managers don't want a 150 accounts than many of them have got to deal with some of the problems and issues either. Is that fair?

Mike Malinowski:

Oh, absolutely. And our account manager in the SBU unit, they love it. They know it. They get to know the small business. It's like you said, a different renewal process, a different proposal process that they're good at. And if it takes an account manager service team that's handling a little small business, that once again is very important to us, but a different way to handle it. But then handling one of our largest accounts to the agency, it's tough for them to even concentrate and know their role. So it was not just, to your point, Brent, it wasn't just the producers too. We had to let the service team get tremendous feedback about the ability to not have such a tremendous amount of accounts. The ones who handle large commercial and the ones who handle the transactional more small business stuff, they're good at it and they're very good at it, and they like doing it. And to your point, yeah, it has to be from all avenues and aspects of how we handle customers, not just producers, but the service teams just as a port.

Brent Kelly:

Yeah. And last comment I'll make on this, by the way, I do want you to reference or resource the article too that you mentioned, so that agencies, is that online somewhere? People can go check it out, Mike?

Mike Malinowski:

Yeah, it was from Marsh Berry article. I can send it to you.

Brent Kelly:

I want to say one more thing, and I want to make sure I didn't lose my train of thought. I probably did, now that I ask you that question. But obviously we're talking about, oh, we're talking about capacity issues and those kinds of things as well. But it really is, I mean, again, this comes back to the basic, the bottom level of we want you to be your best version possible. And to do that, we've got to help you think a bit differently. And all I could think of too, as you said that, Mike, I always get this flashback of when I was way back in junior high, so like a billion years ago now, playing basketball.

I played on a very small school, small team, and in my world I was pretty good. And then all of a sudden I played some larger opponents in a travel league one summer. And when I was in what, seventh, sixth, or seventh grade, some kid in eighth grade came and reversed dunked on me. And my coach said, Hey, Brent, listen, you're in the big leagues now. If you want to play there, you've got to improve your skill. And we all get better in those areas. So I think it's again, a testament to the culture at EHD. A couple more questions, Mike, I'll let you get out of here. And again, this may be bit of a selfish question, but answer however you want. Obviously we've been working together in partnership for, again, I said five plus years at this point. What would you say has probably been the biggest takeaway in working with Sitkins, stuff that you've been able to go implement out in the marketplace or in your agency over the years?

Mike Malinowski:

Yeah, I, and we've talked about this before it, it's been game-changing for us as an organization to talk the same language and come from the same sales process. And that's been the biggest thing. I mean, even our account managers down to our receptionist when they know the Sitkins methodology and they understand it, and some of the things you've done, even from the service team, we've just talking about the am fit to all the way up to the huddles, to the low-risk practice when they know they're doing, practicing all the stuff that we all speak the same language. And it's not the general liability and workers comps, not the insurance, it's the sales process language. So it's been so ingrained in us now and it's worked so well. I mean, our best producers are the ones who really help follow the process of what we've been learned through you and Roger and your team, Brent.

It's been a great culture shift for us where we were so siloed. Some guy was doing it this way, some gal was doing it that way, and some was having success says one. But now we can really help not just evaluate, but help lead newer producers in the right direction. Here's the process, here's the referral process, here's the Green Zone, here's why you want FICs or COINs or all the terminology. Now, if you would've asked me those 10 years ago, I would've looked at you like you were weird. And what the hell does that mean? And why is saying that now you have, you'll have new producers who go through your ProducerFit and they'll say, Hey, I have this COIN.

It's funny to think, what did we do before? What did we do before is the truth? And as you know, we've been very successful with our new business over the last several years. The most we've had in the agency, Roger will say we need more, but we're trying our best to keep breaking records. And that's just a matter of the team doing what they do. But the Sitkins, I don't think we would be where we're at now if we would've engaged with you and gone through this similar sales process that you guys have been great at teaching us and guiding us.

Brent Kelly:

Yeah. Well, thank you, Mike. I appreciate that. And again, we love the relationship. I mean, we talk about this, I mean, there's demographics of agencies and certainly work with agencies of different sizes, but really is, and I know this isn't about to be cliche, but the psychographics, we want to work with agencies that listen, no agency has it all figured out, but they know one thing that we know that we can be better. We strive to be better. We desire growth. We're coachable, we're looking to do things at higher levels, and we love our team. I mean, if you do those things, then we can be really successful together. So I appreciate you sharing that, and it's always great for us to hear too. And I want to say, I don't want to be too long here, but one of the events that we had a few years back when we were out with you guys in person, it was pretty cool. I know Roger got a bit emotional about this, but you all had taken the acronyms and had some fun with it and put those all up on the board and kind of put those together and everybody told a story. And as cool as that was, and it was so cool that the neatest thing is that you all were speaking a similar language, right?

It's the EHD way, but certainly we could contribute to how you speak internally around that. So thank you. Alright, I have one more question. Mike, you ready?

This is the big one. This is the big one. And I ask this question to every guest, so hopefully you're prepared. But if you were having a conversation, actually, your younger version was having a conversation with the current version. So let's say you mentioned you got out of college, or you're starting your career, right? Your first day at EHD maybe, right? So years ago, you said 18 years, right? You've been with the company. So the first day you go to EHD and you're talking to yourself today and said, listen, experience wise, Mike, if there's one piece of advice you could give me to help me over the next 18 years, what would it be?

Mike Malinowski:

Follow the Sitkins process. How's that? Oh, love it. No, I'll tell you though, that honestly I tell you it would've helped as a producer just starting, is to come up with a process, I don't want to say a rigid process, but have a process. Like you can talk about the relationship management calendar, all that stuff. But for a younger producer, if I was sitting there, I'd say, listen to folks that are telling you how to be successful and be your best version possible. Also, read, read, read, read, read as much as you can. Books that you guys always tell us about to make yourself better. And you have to invest in yourself. And I think when I started, it was so much go out and write business, go out and write business where I didn't do enough time even learning my craft and educating myself because now you're so darn busy, it's just not as easy unless you're taking a flight somewhere or you're doing something with some downtime.

But yeah, when you just start, when your mind, you're young and just soak it all in and try to make yourself uncomfortable. And that's the hardest thing to do is really just make yourself uncomfortable to be better. And when you're younger, you're always on guard and you don't want to do that, but that's the only way you get better. And surround yourself with people who will make you uncomfortable, who will make you be constructive and want you to develop. And I think that's the most important thing that I was blessed to have some good leaders, some good people here that would do that once in a while. But I wish I would've done a little more on my own when I first started to educate myself to get better, not just as a salesperson, but as a technician in the industry. So now I'm too old and impatient, Brent, I just don't have, it's a struggle now. Podcasts are better for me than books. How's that?

Brent Kelly:

Listen, I'm a bit the same way. And I've been, first of all, love your perspective on that answer. I mean, there is no wrong answer. And we're going there. It's kind of the Charlie Tremendous Jones quote. He was a famous speaker, but he is also a successful life insurance agent, said, you'll be the same person in five years as you are today, except for the books that you read and the people that you meet. And you think about that back 18 years ago, and I think part of this is when you're, we'll just say in your early twenties or whatever, I got extra free time. The problem is we don't always invest that in the right place, which is normal. But you think about, man, if we're really at a younger age, like you said, whether it's books or I think podcasts didn't exist 18 years ago, right?

I mean, so be able to invest in some of that knowledge. And I mean obviously with what continued to expand and the information world that we live in, it's incredible the advantage that you can get. The challenge, I think, Mike, and again, I'll speak from my perspective, maybe you agree or disagree, but when you're in that frame of mind or that age, it feels like you have forever number one, right? I'm young, I'll be doing this, whatever, I got plenty of time. And number two is the results from a lot of the reading and the growth and the mentorship, they don't happen overnight. It's like you're building this foundation that not many people can see, but when you start to really tap into it, you just start to grow so much faster than those around you. And that's not to be mean to other people, but you're just making that investment yourself and again, and again and again. And all of a sudden you're like, where did that come from? Well, you put the time in. So I dunno if that makes sense.

Mike Malinowski:

Yeah, absolutely. When you're 25 years old or whatever, 24, you don't have to act like you're the smartest guy in the room.

You don't have to come across learn and listen. And it's as corny as everyone says, but sometimes you're so out to prove yourself that your worth and your value, that you just don't sit back a little bit and say, maybe I don't know this, and maybe I should be a little more receptive to ideas. Instead, I got to walk in the room and I know everything. I'm this young hot star doing this. And it can be humbling. But I think if I look back, I wish I would've did a little more of not trying to be that guy and a little more learning and that, where that's what I think it helps some of the younger folks get into this industry. So yeah, I don't know. But like you said, you turn around and it's 20 years later and that's it.

Brent Kelly:

Yeah. Yeah. Well, hopefully you got a little more time left. Mike, you're still a young guy.

Mike Malinowski:

I hope so too, my friend.

Brent Kelly:

Well, hey, we never know, but you're still very young, Mike. I hope I try to be, but all of a sudden I'm like, man, time goes fast. It really does. So great perspective, Mike, thanks so much for being on the podcast. Great, great thoughts that you shared today. I know our audience will appreciate it. We appreciate you being a partner with us. And really, again, the relationship means the world and we're happy to add value to you where we can. So with that, I want to wrap, we'll close up here. Thanks for being a listener of the Agent Leader podcast. As I mentioned, and I'll go back to what I said earlier, if you want to be like Mike in this case and work with Sitkins, we've made it as easy as possible to get started with the best version possible. Fast track, our 90 day process and plan, and go to sitkins.com/fasttrack to learn more. Mike, thank you again. Any final words before we depart?

Mike Malinowski:

Nope. Thank you very much, it's always good talking with you.

Brent Kelly:

Awesome. Thanks so much for being a listener. Wish you all the best in your success. Take care.

 

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